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Vigorelli or Viaorelli?

12 Jan

Saw this on-line today. Kinda bummed me out thinking there are fake frames out there. First there was a fake leader then fake geekhouse and now a cinelli vigorelli, localized to viaorelli.

Here’s the link:  Vigorelli or VIAORELLI




Drop bar & Stem

28 Dec

Having options on handlebar is do come in handy especially if you’re an all-rounder cyclist; urban, long distance, bla bla bla. I guess most of us favored to ride comfortably with riser bar in the early days. Over time we’ll switch to bullhorns & drop bars. Yes drop bars, the classic handlebar.

 

Even big shouldered Keirin riders trust these bars

Personally…drop bars only look best when paired with quill stems be it nitto, cinelli etc etc.  Then you have the option to either go with aluminum or steel stem and aluminum or cro-mo or steel bars. Here are cost comparison to consider:

Al bar + Al stem:
$152 (approx RM471)
660g

Cr-Mo bar + Cr-Mo stem:
$196 (approx RM607)
1135g

Al bar + Cr-Mo stem:
$230 (approx RM713)
770g

Cr-Mo bar + Al stem:
$118 (approx RM366)
1025g

so what’s your pick?

The Custom Bicycle

27 Sep

Stumble upon this e-book while browsing or some stuff today. Apparently it’s a good read as it helps a lot in terms or riding, determining stem length etc. Read it, keep it….if you’re serious about cycling comfortably. Click the image below to dowload the pdf.

Who would put brakes on their keirin bike?

8 Jun

Professional keirin riders of course but why????

brake%2001.jpg

brake%2002.jpg

Why would they? Because they go too fast when they train on the road (if they need to train on the road, since the velodromes there are open all year). No matter what, riding with brakes gives you more options for stopping, and you can stop in a shorter distance in more conditions than just using your legs to halt the fixed gear.

brake%2003.jpg

Those pro keirin riders get paid pretty well, and they frequently race into their later thirties. Though crashes are frequent in actual racing, that’s just part of the job. Getting injured because of a crash on the road doesn’t pay the bills.

A lot of keirin builders also make “training” bikes: fixed gear bikes that are designed to accept brakes front and rear, sometimes with provision for fenders. These bikes do not meet regulations for the keirin circuit, but they are meant to give keirin riders an affordable and suitable training tool for the road.

If you really wanted to ride the certified keirin bike on the road with brakes, you could get something like this precision product made in Japan (photos courtesy of famed keirin rider Koh Annoura). The special mounts allow you to temporarily mount regular road brakes to the bike without altering the bike or even damaging the paint. Cheaper (and kinda cheesy) versions have been available for years in Japan, and I believe Soma will be debuting its version of this brake mounting real soon.

Who would put brakes on their keirin bike?….Professional keirin riders.

brake%2001.jpg

brake%2002.jpg

Why would they? Because they go too fast when they train on the road (if they need to train on the road, since the velodromes there are open all year). No matter what, riding with brakes gives you more options for stopping, and you can stop in a shorter distance in more conditions than just using your legs to halt the fixed gear.

brake%2003.jpg

Those pro keirin riders get paid pretty well, and they frequently race into their later thirties. Though crashes are frequent in actual racing, that’s just part of the job. Getting injured because of a crash on the road doesn’t pay the bills.

A lot of keirin builders also make “training” bikes: fixed gear bikes that are designed to accept brakes front and rear, sometimes with provision for fenders. These bikes do not meet regulations for the keirin circuit, but they are meant to give keirin riders an affordable and suitable training tool for the road.

If you really wanted to ride the certified keirin bike on the road with brakes, you could get something like this precision product made in Japan (photos courtesy of famed keirin rider Koh Annoura). The special mounts allow you to temporarily mount regular road brakes to the bike without altering the bike or even damaging the paint. Cheaper (and kinda cheesy) versions have been available for years in Japan, and I think Soma would have releasing something like this sometime soon.

Make Your Own Lockring Tool

3 Jun

Changing ratios is fun & buying new cog is easy but when it comes to changing the cog, a trip to the bike shop (again??) Anyway here’s a way to make your own Lock Ring Wrench!

Step 1 Gather your weapons!


First thing is to buy some pliers. Just get some OK-OK looking wrench. Just make sure you buy a big enough set that they’ll open wider than the locking and still have the jaws parallel to one another.

You’ll also need something to file the metal, I liked to use a hand file but you could also use a dremel tool with a stone wheel. The cresent wrench in the picture is to take the pliers apart, you probably don’t have to take them apart but I thought it made it easier.

Step 2 Dremel or file the teeth


Get to work cutting down the teeth, leaving the front bit of the pliers to fit into the notches of the lockring. Take your time and try to get them to fit as tight as possible and get the teeth to fit into the notch as far as possible so that they won’t slip off.

Step 3 DONE!!


When you get done they should look something like this. When you go to use them just fit them in the notches, give them a good tight squeeze and crank the lockring off. Remember that the lockring will be reverse threaded, don’t rip the threads off of your hub.

via http://www.instructables.com

Train Your Muscles For Cycling

19 May
CORE EXERCISES

©Don Foley

1. Boxer Ball Crunch
What It Works: Transverse abdominus, obliques, lower back

A. Lie with the middle of your back on a stability ball, your knees bent 90 degrees and your feet flat on the floor. Place your hands behind your head, but don’t pull on your neck.

B. Squeezing your belly button toward your spine, lift your upper back off the ball. Keeping your shoulders off the ball, trace a clockwise oval with your torso. Apply pressure with your lower back to keep the ball still through the entire motion. After 15 clockwise ovals, trace 15 counterclockwise.

Why It Works: Despite the straightforward motion of the bike, your body moves in three directions: forward as you head down the road, vertically as your legs pedal up and down, and laterally as your hips and upper body rock side to side. “This fluid, circular exercise builds control,” says Street, and that helps you minimize lateral torsion and wasted motion.

©Don Foley

2. Power Bridge
What It Works: Hip flexors, glutes, lower back

A. Lying on your back, bend your knees and place your heels near your glutes. Arms are at your sides, palms down.

B. In one smooth motion, squeeze your glutes, raise your hips off the floor and push up from your heels to form a straight line from shoulders to knees; toes come off the floor slightly. Hold for two seconds. Keeping your toes raised, lower yourself three-quarters of the way to complete one rep. Do 20 repetitions.

Why It Works: In addition to stretching the hip flexors, often extremely stiff in cyclists, the bridge strengthens the link between your lower back and glutes.

©Don Foley

3. Hip Extension
What It Works: Lower back, hamstrings, glutes

A. Lying with your hips and stomach on the stability ball, put your hands on the floor directly under your shoulders, and extend your legs with toes resting on the floor.

B. With a straight spine and shoulder blades back, as if you’re trying to make them touch, lift both legs off the floor, keeping them straight. If possible, raise them slightly higher than parallel to the floor. Hold for two seconds and lower. Do 20 reps.

Why It Works: This movement builds backside strength, for added efficiency on the second half of the pedal stroke.

©Don Foley

4. Plank
What It Works: Transverse abdominus, upper and lower back

A. Lying on your stomach, place your elbows under your shoulders with forearms and hands on the floor.

B. Lift your hips off the floor, keeping your back straight and abs tight, and rest on your toes. Aim for 60 seconds.

Why It Works: The plank builds the strength and muscular endurance you need to ride powerfully in the drops or in an aero position long after others have surrendered to the top of the handlebar.

©Don Foley

5. Transverse Plank
What It Works: Transverse abdominus and obliques

A. Lie on your right side, with your right elbow under your shoulder, forearm in front for stability, and stack your left foot on your right. Raise your left arm over your head.

B. In one motion, lift your hips to create a straight line down your left side. Lower your hips a few inches off the floor; do 10 to 15 reps, then switch sides.

Why It Works: Strong obliques improve your stability in the saddle, letting you take on hairpin corners with more control and speed.

©Don Foley

6. Scissors Kick
What It Works: Transverse abdominus, hip flexors, inner and outer thighs

A. Lying on your back with legs straight, place both hands palms down under your lower back.

B. Pushing your elbows down into the floor and pulling your belly button toward your spine, raise your shoulders off the floor and look toward the ceiling. Raise your legs 4 inches off the ground and scissor them: left leg over right, then right over left. That’s one rep. Work up to 100.

Why It Works: A comprehensive movement that connects key cycling muscles, the kick also builds inner-thigh muscles, which help you achieve hip, knee and forefoot alignment for a proper and efficient pedal stroke.

©Don Foley

7. Catapult
What It Works: Entire core

A. Sitting with a slight bend in your knees, press your heels against the floor. Extend arms to the front at shoulder height, palms facing each other.

B. With a straight spine and upward gaze, inhale deeply, then exhale and slowly lower your torso to the floor over five counts as you inhale. Arms are overhead.

C. In one smooth movement, leading with the arms, exhale and explode back to the starting position. Do 20 reps.

Why It Works: Contrary to its name, the catapult encourages supreme body control.

©Don Foley

8. Boat Pose
What It Works: Transverse abdominus, lower back

A. Sit, resting both hands lightly behind you, and lean back until your torso is at a 45-degree angle.

B. Keeping your legs together, lift them off the floor as you extend arms forward at shoulder height. Abs are tight, as thighs and torso form a 90-degree angle. If your hamstrings are tight, you’ll need to bend your knees a little. Work up to holding for 60 seconds.

Why It Works: As with the plank, this pose builds the lower-back stability and core strength needed to remain bent over the handlebar for hours, or to blast up hills without compromising power or speed.

Trailer oh trailer

19 May

Fun riding track bikes in city street….